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archiemcphee:

Ukrainian nature photographer Vyacheslav Mishchenko shows us that snails are so much more than incredibly slow-moving mollusks who leave slimy trails and sometimes end up on people’s dinner plates. By looking at his photos we learn that snails appear to be curious, playful and even affectionate.

Shot in the woodland area near his home town in Berdichev, located in the Zhytomyr Oblast of northern Ukraine, Mishchenko’s beautiful photos are apparently unstaged. Instead he relies on an extraordinarily keen eye for spotting wildlife:

'As a child, my father taught me to hunt mushrooms near my home and we would always come across all manner of bugs and creatures,' he said. 'As I got older and my interest in photography grew, I decided I wanted to catch these magical scenes on camera.'

Visit Vyacheslav Mishchenkos’ website to check out many more of his remarkable nature photos. The only thing missing from them is narration by Sir David Attenborough.

[via 22 Words and Dailymail.co.uk]

montereybayaquarium:

We recently re-united two snowy plover chicks with their father—a first!
The tagged chicks were mistakenly picked up by beachgoers who thought they were abandoned, and brought to the Aquarium for care. The adult plover still had one chick with him, and representatives of California State Parks and Point Blue put a small cage over the chick to keep the parent close by until we could arrive with the other two.  We then placed all three chicks in the enclosure to give the dad a chance to see them.  After ensuring that the male was interested in the chicks, we removed the cage and he began caring for all three once again. Success!
Once numbering in the thousands, U.S. Pacific coast western snowy plovers were listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act in 1993.  Today it’s estimated that only about 2,100 plovers breed along the coast, with the largest number found from south San Francisco Bay to southern Baja California. You can help keep adult plovers from abandoning their nests. Keep your dog on a leash on beaches during snowy plover breeding season and stay out of areas that have been blocked off as bird nesting sights.
Learn more
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montereybayaquarium:

We recently re-united two snowy plover chicks with their father—a first!

The tagged chicks were mistakenly picked up by beachgoers who thought they were abandoned, and brought to the Aquarium for care. The adult plover still had one chick with him, and representatives of California State Parks and Point Blue put a small cage over the chick to keep the parent close by until we could arrive with the other two.  We then placed all three chicks in the enclosure to give the dad a chance to see them.  After ensuring that the male was interested in the chicks, we removed the cage and he began caring for all three once again. Success!

Once numbering in the thousands, U.S. Pacific coast western snowy plovers were listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act in 1993.  Today it’s estimated that only about 2,100 plovers breed along the coast, with the largest number found from south San Francisco Bay to southern Baja California. You can help keep adult plovers from abandoning their nests. Keep your dog on a leash on beaches during snowy plover breeding season and stay out of areas that have been blocked off as bird nesting sights.

Learn more


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